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THE LAND WHERE THE BIRDS SING

THE LAND WHERE THE BIRDS SING

ARTWORK INFORMATION

ARTWORK INFORMATION

Material: Gouache on Paper Cut-Out Installation

Dimensions: Hexagones size 23x23 - 30x30 - 37x37

Time: July - August 2019

Location: Academie Minerva, Groningen, the Netherlands

 

 

Material: Gouache on Paper Cut-Out Installation

Dimensions: Hexagones size 23x23 - 30x30 - 37x37

Time: July - August 2019

Location: Academie Minerva, Groningen, the Netherlands

For the residence program in Academie Minerva, I researched Dutch traditional folk art. The Dutch art from the Old Masters of the Dutch Golden Age to the Avant-Garde of the 19th & 20th century such as Van Gogh or Mondriaan, has been world-renowned and iconic. On the other hand, during this period, Vietnamese art (i.e. Academy Art in Western definition) was still in its infancy. Before this period, folk art is the leading art style of Vietnam. These facts have stimulated my interest and curiosity. I keep wondering if Dutch Fork Art and the Vietnamese counterpart have anything in common.

The starting point of my project was a trip to Hindeloopen, a small village with 875 inhabitants located on the West Sea of the country. Mostly known for its folk art, the Hindeloopen art enjoyed its heyday during the 17th century and declined in the 18th century, making way for other styles of art. Elements of nature such as flowers or plants can be easily found on Hindelooper art. Quite so often, a "lucky bird" “perches” at the center of the design amidst the flowers. The bird is always featured in the position of looking over his shoulder to keep evil spirits away. These motifs share a lot in common with Vietnamese folk art. 2 countries, from 2 sides of the world, turn out to have interesting things in common. 

"The Land Where the Birds Sing" is my attempt to give the Dutch folk art a different look with my art practice. The motifs were sampled, reconstructed and put on various pieces of hexagones, which together create a beehive. Also, the Vietnamese motifs are blended in the work. The beehive represents the idea of connecting two different cultures, and finding a common voice between seemingly different arts.

 

For the residence program in Academie Minerva, I researched Dutch traditional folk art. The Dutch art from the Old Masters of the Dutch Golden Age to the Avant-Garde of the 19th & 20th century such as Van Gogh or Mondriaan, has been world-renowned and iconic. On the other hand, during this period, Vietnamese art (i.e. Academy Art in Western definition) was still in its infancy. Before this period, folk art is the leading art style of Vietnam. These facts have stimulated my interest and curiosity. I keep wondering if Dutch Fork Art and the Vietnamese counterpart have anything in common.

The starting point of my project was a trip to Hindeloopen, a small village with 875 inhabitants located on the West Sea of the country. Mostly known for its folk art, the Hindeloopen art enjoyed its heyday during the 17th century and declined in the 18th century, making way for other styles of art. Elements of nature such as flowers or plants can be easily found on Hindelooper art. Quite so often, a "lucky bird" “perches” at the center of the design amidst the flowers. The bird is always featured in the position of looking over his shoulder to keep evil spirits away. These motifs share a lot in common with Vietnamese folk art. 2 countries, from 2 sides of the world, turn out to have interesting things in common. 

"The Land Where the Birds Sing" is my attempt to give the Dutch folk art a different look with my art practice. The motifs were sampled, reconstructed and put on various pieces of hexagones, which together create a beehive. Also, the Vietnamese motifs are blended in the work. The beehive represents the idea of connecting two different cultures, and finding a common voice between seemingly different arts.  

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DESIGNED BY XUÂN LAM © 2020

DESIGNED BY XUÂN LAM © 2020